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news - HYDROcontest from 23 to 27 July 2014

July 18 2014

Five days and counting to the start of HYDROcontest
The boats of the future battle it out in Lausanne!

Want to see what the future's boats will look like? If so, head down to the Centre Sportif de Dorigny in Lausanne between 23 and 27 July. Organised by Hydros, wih the support of the Lombard Odier Group and the Service Industriels de Genève, the HYDROcontest will, in a world exclusive, showcase futuristic boats that are the fruit of research by students from around the globe. This exceptional event will provide a glimpse of a future for maritime transport that is environmentally friendly.

With more than 120 students from six countries competing in 13 teams, the first edition of the HYDROcontest promises to be an exciting affair. Over five days, the teams of future engineers will pit their electric boats against each other on the lake in a series of races to decide who qualifies for the finals. The challenge set by Hydros is simple: to design boats capable of going faster for longer, while consuming less energy. To win the HYDROcontest, competitors must create the most efficient and most reliable boat, for racing throughout the entire competition.

A village with a whole host activities for spectators

A 7,000-m2 village for spectators is currently under construction near Dorigny beach. Entry to the village will be free. Paddocks will allow visitors, young and old, to get a closer look at the prototypes by each of the 13 teams. With the race course lying close to the shore, spectators will be able to follow the race from the beach, or watch it on a big screen.

A whole host of activities will be held for participants and spectators alike. There will, for example, be a large pool for trying out small-scale remote-control models of hydrofoils that "fly" across the water. Visitors will also be able to immerse themselves in the world of Hydros through a new exhibition looking at the history of hydrofoils. Indeed, the first attempts to build boats with submerged wings, which raise vessels above the water to reduce resistance, date back to 1860.

More information: Official Website